Jenny’s August Newsletter

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“If you go down to the woods today, you’d better not go alone! It’s lovely down in the woods today, But safer to stay at home!”

Does anyone remember when the grounds of Cameron House were home to 32 bears as part of the Cameron Bear Park? That was before I moved to the area and it’s difficult for me to imagine. I have recently returned from holiday to Alberta, Canada, where I was really lucky to see both a black bear and a grizzly bear in the wild. It felt very surreal to be within such close proximity to these beautiful, yet dangerous wild creatures, and I watched in complete awe as the small black bear ignored me and continued with his frantic berry munching. The grizzly, on the other hand, commanded a much greater air of confidence and superiority, and I was glad that I was tucked away in the safety of my hire car as he strolled past my window. This experience led me to wonder how I would go about my daily routine at work if I had to be mindful of the dangers of wild animals roaming nearby. In reality, my job does bring with it the likelihood of encountering much smaller adversaries; ticks.

Ticks are small spiderlike animals that bite to fasten themselves onto the skin and feed on blood. Tick live in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas, and tick bites occur most often during early spring to late summer and in areas where there are many wild animals and birds. It is important to remove a tick as soon as you find it, as the risk of acquiring a tick-borne illness depends on many factors, including where you live, what type of tick bit you, and how long it was attached. It is crucial to remember that if you do feel unwell or develop a rash around the tick bite, to consult your doctor. Click here to find out more information.

On a slightly lighter note, I am delighted to tell you all that after months of tracking them, I finally captured the Carrick’s otters on my wildlife camera. If you would like to know more information about the otters and see the video please click here. I hope to keep you updated on our three furry friends in future newsletters!

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